Spiritual Medium Video

Source : Yahoo AnswersQuestion : What was the impact of Iran’s 1979 revolution on that country’s art?

Answer by ?
What do you mean by “that” iran or something else

Answer by Winston Chau
The 1979 Revolution changed the dynamics of the arts scene. The Revolution itself was documented by the photographer Abbas (born 1944), who had just returned to Iran for a project to examine changes in society brought by Iran’s oil boom. Caught in the moment, he recorded both the fervent demonstrations of the masses and the dealings of the higher level politicians.

After the takeover by the Islamic government, museums and galleries enjoyed less latitude than they had in previous years. Art of this period is dominated by Iran’s war with Iraq (1980–88), and the responses of many artists to its horrors. Sadegh Tirafkan (born 1965) completed a series of photographs in memory of the many friends who died in the war. The war also fostered a certain development in the graphic arts, as stark, powerful posters were created to galvanize national support and to commemorate the many lives lost. Tirafkan’s other photographs explore his relationship as an Iranian male with his country’s ancient past. The most recent is a series based in Persepolis.

The late 1990s has witnessed a spurt of artistic activity, with many artists like Farah Ossuli (born 1953) working in Iran now. She has chosen the medium of Persian miniature painting as the point of departure for her art. In her paintings, Ossuli replaces the spaces for text with fields of color and manipulates the scale of the figures, many of which are women. She appropriates the language of miniature painting, yet re-presents it in a contemporary idiom. Ossuli says the following about her work: “Miniaturists say that being a contemporary miniaturist means being a magician, someone who can do incredible things, be rigorous, work five years on a painting, or be able to draw a line that is invisible. But I want to make visible that which is unsaid, and I take only a reasonable pain in creating my works. So, I am definitely not a miniaturist.”

There are also a number of Iranians working outside the country, who represent the generation caught in the crossfire of the Revolution. Many are students who had left Iran to pursue a higher education in other countries and who were away during the Revolution and sometimes not permitted to return for many years. Shirazeh Houshiary (born 1955), who has settled in London, and Shirin Neshat (born 1957), who lives in New York, are two such artists. Houshiary’s early works are patinated metal sculptures based on Islamic geometric forms. Her more recent works are monochrome paintings, which appear to be blank canvases in white or black when viewed from a distance, but a complex web of intricately etched markings in graphite when viewed up close. These works are elusive and sometimes barely visible, suggesting a quest for the self in physical form. They encapsulate the essence of human presence—the breath. On a mystical level, Houshiary’s works can be interpreted as a metaphor for Divine light and man’s eternal search for union with the Divine.

Neshat’s work grapples with issues of exile and identity and reflects her attempts to cope with the changes in the country from which she felt so alienated. In the Women of Allah series (1997.129.8)and in her more recent video installations, poetic texts cover the body parts of women. Her works contain a strong poetic and lyrical element, although they address “forbidden” subjects such as Islam, revolution, women, femininity, and violence. It is the juxtaposition of conflicting and dissonant elements such as the veil and the gun that makes Neshat’s work so compelling. She is a master of video installation. One of her most recent works is inspired by the novel Women Without Men by Shahrnoush Parsipour and the story of the Tooba tree in the Holy Qur’an. Here, Neshat uses the tree as a metaphor for a spiritual longing for paradise and a quest for political power, drawing on her cultural heritage to create works that resonate with universal ideas such as loss, meaning, and memory.

Source : Yahoo AnswersQuestion : What was the impact of Iran’s 1979 revolution on that country’s art?

Answer by Winston Chau
The 1979 Revolution changed the dynamics of the arts scene. The Revolution itself was documented by the photographer Abbas (born 1944), who had just returned to Iran for a project to examine changes in society brought by Iran’s oil boom. Caught in the moment, he recorded both the fervent demonstrations of the masses and the dealings of the higher level politicians.

After the takeover by the Islamic government, museums and galleries enjoyed less latitude than they had in previous years. Art of this period is dominated by Iran’s war with Iraq (1980–88), and the responses of many artists to its horrors. Sadegh Tirafkan (born 1965) completed a series of photographs in memory of the many friends who died in the war. The war also fostered a certain development in the graphic arts, as stark, powerful posters were created to galvanize national support and to commemorate the many lives lost. Tirafkan’s other photographs explore his relationship as an Iranian male with his country’s ancient past. The most recent is a series based in Persepolis.

The late 1990s has witnessed a spurt of artistic activity, with many artists like Farah Ossuli (born 1953) working in Iran now. She has chosen the medium of Persian miniature painting as the point of departure for her art. In her paintings, Ossuli replaces the spaces for text with fields of color and manipulates the scale of the figures, many of which are women. She appropriates the language of miniature painting, yet re-presents it in a contemporary idiom. Ossuli says the following about her work: “Miniaturists say that being a contemporary miniaturist means being a magician, someone who can do incredible things, be rigorous, work five years on a painting, or be able to draw a line that is invisible. But I want to make visible that which is unsaid, and I take only a reasonable pain in creating my works. So, I am definitely not a miniaturist.”

There are also a number of Iranians working outside the country, who represent the generation caught in the crossfire of the Revolution. Many are students who had left Iran to pursue a higher education in other countries and who were away during the Revolution and sometimes not permitted to return for many years. Shirazeh Houshiary (born 1955), who has settled in London, and Shirin Neshat (born 1957), who lives in New York, are two such artists. Houshiary’s early works are patinated metal sculptures based on Islamic geometric forms. Her more recent works are monochrome paintings, which appear to be blank canvases in white or black when viewed from a distance, but a complex web of intricately etched markings in graphite when viewed up close. These works are elusive and sometimes barely visible, suggesting a quest for the self in physical form. They encapsulate the essence of human presence—the breath. On a mystical level, Houshiary’s works can be interpreted as a metaphor for Divine light and man’s eternal search for union with the Divine.

Neshat’s work grapples with issues of exile and identity and reflects her attempts to cope with the changes in the country from which she felt so alienated. In the Women of Allah series (1997.129.8)and in her more recent video installations, poetic texts cover the body parts of women. Her works contain a strong poetic and lyrical element, although they address “forbidden” subjects such as Islam, revolution, women, femininity, and violence. It is the juxtaposition of conflicting and dissonant elements such as the veil and the gun that makes Neshat’s work so compelling. She is a master of video installation. One of her most recent works is inspired by the novel Women Without Men by Shahrnoush Parsipour and the story of the Tooba tree in the Holy Qur’an. Here, Neshat uses the tree as a metaphor for a spiritual longing for paradise and a quest for political power, drawing on her cultural heritage to create works that resonate with universal ideas such as loss, meaning, and memory.

Source : Yahoo AnswersQuestion : What was Michael Jackson’s Religion when he died?

There has been a lot of stories about MJ converting to Islam and some say it’s true and others don’t. I care because I REALY like him. If there’s no Micheal Jackson in heaven, then I don’t want to be there…

Answer by Made in the 90s♥
“If there’s no Michael Jackson in heaven, I don’t want to be there.”

You’re weird…

Answer by lisakay85
BORN AGAIN SAINT who knows silly question ask the media.

Answer by Shampoozie
R.I.P.

Answer by kristyn1_2002
I’m not sure. He was raised as a Jehovah’s Witness but it is doubtful that he stuck with that religion, so it is unclear. His brother Jermaine converted to Islam and it is rumored that Michael did as well, as he is said to have expressed some interest in the religion and had lived in Bahrain for a time.

Answer by Rafath
michael initially was a jehova’s witness. later he converted to islam.
hope the Almighty forgives him and give him a place in jannah.
Amen

Answer by M.JACKSON LIVES
Micheal Jackson died as a muslim. he coverted around 2 years ago.
His brother said on the news a few days ago, that he wants to be buried as a muslim. All this confusion about his religion, i wonder why??????

i ve been glued to the news ever since i heard the tragic event. they only mentioned he is muslim once.

here is a youtube link

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KS3V7j4jLV0

Answer by Obedient & submisive & Muslim
he is muslim and he is in heaven cause islam is the religion of people who enter heaven:

http://www.nypost.com/seven/11202008/news/nationalnews/michael_jackson_converts_to_islam_139892.htm

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/music/2008/11/21/2008-11-21_call_him_mikaeel_michael_jackson_reporte.html

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/475791/michel_jakson_give_thanks_to_allah/

Answer by Pinkx
YES MICHAEL WAZ A MUSLIM
i dun understand y ppl dun believe dat MJ died as muslim !! MJ accepted islam in 2007, he converted hiz name to mikaeel.. he myt b actually moving to Bahrain n decided to funding d construction of a mosque in Bahrain.. he’d olso sung Hamd ‘give thanks to Allah’..

HE HIMSELF CON4MED HIZ CONVERSION TO ISLAM IN MIDDLE EAST.. (2008)

ov courz dey would ve buried him in grave ov muslim’z graveyard!!
buh d fact z dat media havnt shown yet !!
or may b dey wanna hide..!!
dat z true he applied many religions buh still he waz nt satisfied, wen he accept islam he got perfect satisfication..

Answer by Charis M
No religion, the converting hasn’t officially confirmed.
He was a Jehovah Witness, but he stoped after the album Thriller, which Witnesses criticized. (?)
He might showed an interest but he never converted.
His brother said that his funeral will be buried like a muslim, not as a muslim. Huge difference.

Answer by Danish Esa
He was obviously Muslim
duh

Answer by PennySerenade
Well I Knew He Grew Up As A Jehovah’s Witness (His Mother Was One) And Contrary To Rumors About Him Being Kicked Out Of The Religion Because Of The Thriller Song And Video (1984) He Was Still A Practicing Devout Jehovah’s Witness Until 1991, At Which Point He Is Said To Have ‘Disassociated’ Himself From The Religion, To Follow
Whatever Course It Was That He Wished To Take.

He Was Thought Of As Being Interested In The Jewish Faith Due To His Close Friendship With The Rabbi Shmuley, Although This Proved To Be Just A Close Friendship. Interesting In 2000, Michael Jackson Wrote An Article For BeliefNet.Com In Which He Spoke Of The Meaning Of Sabbath To Him, In Which He Said That The Most Enjoyable Times Of His Childhood Were The Days, When Not Working, That He Would Devote To His Religion (Then Jehovah’s Witness). He Also Clarifies That He Continued To Do So, In Disguise, To Get Away From The Fame And Feel Normality, Up Until 1991. He Also Speaks Of His Jehovah’s Witness Mother As Being Almost ‘Divine’, But Gives No Mention Of His Father, Joe Jackson,
Whose Own Mother And Step-Father Were Jehovah’s Witnesses Also.

Unfortunately In 1993 And 2005 He Was Accused Of Sexual Abuse, (Both Times He Was Acquitted, But Undoubtably It Had A Knock On Effect On His View In World Media).

Rabbi Shmuley Who Was A Close Friend At The Time Advised Him To Return To His Former Beliefs As A Jehovah’s Witness, As He Believed That These Beliefs Had Kept Him Grounded In The Past And Would Be Beneficial, And Around The Time Of The Court Cases In 2005, Newspapers Were Reporting That He Had Begun Regularly Attending Jehovah’s Witness Meetings With His Children, And Reportedly, These Were The Only Places, With Members Of The Public Around, Where The Children’s Masks Would Be Taken Off, So Until Recently People At These Meetings Were The Only Members Of The Public Who Had Seen The Children’s Faces. This Led Some To Believe That Jackson Had Rejoined His Former Religion.

However This Was Only Published In Local Newspapers And Did Not Gain The Attention Of World Media, Who Were More Interested In The Ongoing Court Case.

However Around The Time Of Jackson’s Debts To An Arab Sheik Being Reported In The Media It Was Reported That Jackson Had Converted To Islam And Changed His Name To Mikaeel. However Jackson Never Spoke Out About This And Acknowledged It Publicly So Many Believe That It Was Either A Small Phase In Which He Expressed Interest In The Religion, Or Simply Another Internet Hoax Or Rumor.

Michael’s Brother, Jermaine Jackson Had Being A Muslim From 1989
Onwards And Spoke Of Bringing Back Islamic Books From Mecca On His Pilgrimage There Which Michael Read And (Michael, Always Being A Deeply Spiritual Person) Said That He Was Proud Of His Brother For Finding Some Sort Of Spiritual Haven. Michael, Often Pictured Obscuring His Face In Recent Years Often, Was Pictured Wearing What Appeared To Be A Female Muslim Veil, Which Some Took As A Sign Of His Conversion, However For A Muslim Man, It Would Not Be Regarded As Proper To Wear Females Clothing, So I Doubt That Particular Source.

But There Had Been No Religious News On Michael At The Time Of His Death So It’s A Difficult Question To Answer. It Appears That The Last Religion He Did Have Any Part In Was The Jehovah’s Witness Religion, As The Rumors Of His Conversion To Islam Were Never Proved To Be True, However They Were Also Never Proved To Be False Either. I Expect That Unless A Reliable Source Comes Out We Will Have To Wait Until The Funeral To Find Out.

Source : YoutubeWatch this video on Spiritual Medium Video

Medium James Van Praagh Reveals His Process For Communicating With Spirits

Written by PsychicKathy

Hi! I am Kathy, a clairvoyant, clairaudient, and clairsentient psychic, as well as a fully-conscious medium. I do not use tools, so if you are looking for tarot, astrology or anything like that, sorry that’s not me!.

I have been psychic since childhood, tracing my abilities back several generations, through my mother and grandmother on my mom’s Irish side,and to at least my grandmother on my dad’s Polish side. We all get our gifts from God, and no other place.

The first time I really remember using my abilities was when I was about 10- we were lost on a trip to visit relatives who had bought a new house and farm in a different state. I was able to navigate our way to the relative’s house, and once there knew where everything was, even down to the silverware drawer! Deja vu, indeed!